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What are the limitations for network object names in R80.10?

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In R77 we had to give names that are 0-9A-Za-z-_  

Non-English letters were not supported, and no non-alphanumeric characters other an - and _ were supported. Also, name could not start with a digit.

What is the situation in R80.10? And if that situation is different, how does that affect pre-R80 gateways?

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Re: What are the limitations for network object names in R80.10?

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R80 security management server has removed any limitation for naming your network objects.

You can start the object's name with digits.

You can type non-English characters.

You can use spaces and basically any character you like.

The gateways (any version including R80.10) still require English alphanumeric names that must start with letters. During policy installation, any names which cannot be accepted by the gateways are converted to random gateway-accepted names, usually start with "v" followed by a GUID. R80 log servers can translate the gateway-compatible names to the original names given by the user.

This separates the user experience gap from the gateway technology gap.

This is now acceptable by all gateways in all versions:

So is this (Hebrew for "South American Server Farm"):

And so is this (Chinese for "Cloud Agent"):

The only exception is user objects - because these object names actually represent the user identifier by the identity server. So we kept the limitations as enforced by identity servers.

1 Reply

Re: What are the limitations for network object names in R80.10?

Jump to solution

R80 security management server has removed any limitation for naming your network objects.

You can start the object's name with digits.

You can type non-English characters.

You can use spaces and basically any character you like.

The gateways (any version including R80.10) still require English alphanumeric names that must start with letters. During policy installation, any names which cannot be accepted by the gateways are converted to random gateway-accepted names, usually start with "v" followed by a GUID. R80 log servers can translate the gateway-compatible names to the original names given by the user.

This separates the user experience gap from the gateway technology gap.

This is now acceptable by all gateways in all versions:

So is this (Hebrew for "South American Server Farm"):

And so is this (Chinese for "Cloud Agent"):

The only exception is user objects - because these object names actually represent the user identifier by the identity server. So we kept the limitations as enforced by identity servers.